Less Conspicuous Electric-Assist Bicycle from Faraday Bicycles

In view of recent news reports of inspections for mechanical doping, we look at a beautifully designed electric-assist bike from Faraday Bicycles.

Faraday Bicycles

Source: FaradayBikes.com

The Faraday Porteur was reportedly designed with help from Rock Lobster Cycles. And, as any good startup or kickstarter should, Faraday got their IP in order. On February 24, 2015, US 8,960,702 issued, and on April 2, 2013, US 8,408,349 issued to Faraday.

Faraday FIGs 2 and 3

FIGS. 2 and 3 of the ‘349 Patent, above, show that the electronics housing 50 is disposed between the upper top tube 40 and the lower top tube 38 and rearward of the seat tube 16.

Faraday FIG 4

FIG. 4 of the ‘349 Patent shows batteries 42 and 44 extending into the upper top tube 40 and the lower top tube 38, respectively, from the electronics housing 50.

Farady FIG 9

FIG. 9 of the ‘702 Patent shows an another design in which a battery management electronics unit 266 is disposed in the seat tube 244 and the battery pack 254 is disposed in the down tube 242.

Not sure that this bike will be winning any races, but it looks like a great option for getting around town.

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Trek’s Externally-Geared, Belt-Driven Mountain Bike

Conventional wisdom in the belt drive arena tells us that belt drive is only for single speed setups, and an internally geared hub or a gearbox is needed to change gear ratios.

Not so according to Trek. Trek is pursing a US patent application that shows a hardtail mountain bike with both belt drive and a rear derailleur. In March of 2012, Trek was issued a US design patent drawn to the chainring for this implementation.

Screen shot 2015-02-04 at 1.36.59 PM

One or both of the crankset and wheel hub cogs can include more than one cog having different circumferential sizes so as to alter the mechanical advantage provided between the pedals and the driven hub. … It is envisioned that, when provided in a multiple geared format, bicycle 30 be equipped with a front and/or a rear derailleur assembly to facilitate the manual lateral manipulation of the flexible drive member 80 in effectuating shifting of the gearing arrangement of bicycle 30 such that flexible drive member 80 cooperate with one of cogs 120200, or 300 as desired.”

In other words, Trek envisions belt-driven bikes to have both front and rear derailleurs.

Here’s a portion of Trek’s belt drive cassette:

Screen shot 2015-02-04 at 1.39.39 PM

In the cross-section of the cassette, you can see that the belt 80 is engaged in the largest cog and moveable to the right as indicated by arrow 434.

And, here’s a better look at the design of the cogs:

Screen shot 2015-02-04 at 1.43.50 PM

Screen shot 2015-02-04 at 1.43.22 PM

Looks like belt drive may be finding more applications soon.

Application: US 12/985,166
Application Status: Final Rejection – Early Response Due February 12, 2015
Assignee: Trek Bicycle Corp. (original assignee)
Related Patents/Applications: D655,225 (issued March 6, 2012)