Bike IP at Dirt Fest!

About to head out to Dirt Rag’s Dirt Fest for the day!

Dirt Fest 2015_Pivot

Looking forward to seeing everybody out there!

Advertisements

Razor’s Handlebar Grip Covers

I saw many riders with handlebar hand warmers over the past winter, and I often wished I had some. These handlebar grip covers may not be insulating, but I kind of find myself wanting to roll up to a race with these:

Scary 1

Talk about intimidation! From US 2015/0114167, filed on October 30, 2013, and published on April 30, 2015, Razor discloses handlebar grip covers with a fun design.

Often, it is desirable for a vehicle or scooter to have visual features that personalize the scooter. It is also desirable to have covers or other accessories on the handlebars to provide visual effect and/or protection to the user. It is also generally desirable that the covers or handlebar accessories do not interfere with the performance of the vehicle or a user’s ability to ride or steer the vehicle. … An aspect of the present invention involves the realization that it is desirable to provide a handlebar accessory that covers a user’s hand and also allows a user to easily ride or steer the vehicle. It is also desirable to have a hand cover to provide visual effect and a unique aesthetic without negatively affecting a user’s ability to ride and steer the vehicle.

Yes, these are actually intended for children’s scooters, and they’re already on the market:

Scary Fig 1Razor Scooter

Source: Shop.Razor.com

But, a lot of people dress up for the Ed Sander Memorial CX race here DC/MD/VA, and these would be perfect for a flat bar bike. Or, maybe the next trend in the bike polo or the fixie community?

New Details about SRAM’s ETAP Wireless Rear Derailleur

Although unannounced, everybody knows by now that SRAM is coming out with a wireless, electronic drivetrain. In the press, the system has become to be known as “eTap”. Judging from SRAM’s Valentine’s Day 2014 trademark application, which describes SRAM’s intent to use ETAP with “Bicycle parts, namely, gear shifting mechanisms, brakes, cranks and derailleurs,” the groupset will likely be branded as eTap.

Last week, SRAM’s patent application US 14/061138 published as US 2015/0111675, which provides details about SRAM’s new wireless rear derailleur. As BikeRadar has reported, the rear derailleur includes a lithium-ion battery 178:

SRAM Battery 1SRAM Battery 2

And, as seen in the below photos by RoadBikeReview, the battery will be interchangeable between front and rear derailleurs:

rd 1 roadbikereview fd 1 roadbikereview

An interesting innovation disclosed in the application is how the SRAM rear derailleur accounts for impacts without damaging the internal gearing – simply, the connection between the internal gears and the parallelogram includes a dutch spring mechanism that can absorb any impacts without transferring the impact to the internal gears.  In FIGs. 15a, 15b, and 15c below, the views are looking up from below the derailleur such that the rear wheel and in-board direction are to the right.  As shown below, the leg 52a of the spring 52 deflects to absorb an impact from the left.

SRAM 15a

SRAM 15b

SRAM 15c

In the event of a crash or other side impact (a force directed from left to right in FIGS. 15a, b and c), if the force of the impact overcomes the preload in the torsion-type dutch spring 52, the links of the linkage 32 rotate clockwise about their pivot pins 28, deflecting the leg 52a of the spring as shown in FIG. 15b. Thus, the linkage 32 is able to move without imparting any movement to the gears 106 in the gearbox 44. When the impact force is removed from the derailleur 20, the spring leg 52a will push against the drive arm 48 and cause the derailleur to go back to its normal state shown in FIG. 15a.

And, as expected in a wireless system, the derailleur includes a radio chip 194, but not much more than that is disclosed about the radio chip 194 in this application.

Schwalbe’s ProCore System – Another take on Tubeless?

Admittedly, I think too often about tires. I was excited to talk to the guys from Schwalbe, at NAHBS 2015, about their ProCore System.

As seen below, the ProCore System an outer tire (like your normal tire), an inner tire (the blue, smaller tire inside the normal tire), a tube inside the inner tire, and a valve that can fill both the tube and the space between the inner tire and the outer tire.

konstruktion-gb

Source: Schwalbe.com

An analogy is that the ProCore System would be like running a tubed, high pressure road tire inside your low pressure mountain tire.

Source: Schwalbe.com

The innovations that allow the ProCore System to come to market are described in US 20150090385, which published on April 2, 2015.  When the first systems were being talked about, they had 2 stems – one for each of the air chambers.  This would have required to users to drill a second valve stem hole in their rims or rim manufacturers to provide special rims for the system to work.  Schwalbe came up with a two-way valve stem that is capable of filling both the tube and the air chamber between the inner tire and the outer tire.

a two-way valve, wherein a first outlet of the two-way valve is in communication with the interior space of the tube, and a second outlet of the two-way valve in the mounted condition is in communication with the air duct between the rim and the tube, and between the tube and the inner tire up to the through opening in the inner tire

Another innovation provided to ensure that both air chambers are fillable is the ProCore Air Guide, which provides a path from the valve stem to the air chamber between the inner tire and the outer tire.

The inner tire and tube not only protect against pinch flats, they also help keep the beads of the low pressure outer tire in place to prevent burping.

Typically, the tube 233 of the tire assembly according to the invention is filled via the two-way valve 238 with a comparatively high pressure, for example, 6 to 8 bar. This is to ensure that the tire beads 230, 232 of the inner tire 228 are pressed outwards with high force, in FIG. 22 to the left hand side and the right hand side, respectively, and thereby, the tire beads 220, 222 of the wheel tire 214 are as well pressed outwards against the rim edges of the rim 210. This is to ensure that the tire beads 220, 222 of the wheel tire 214 do not disconnect from the rim edges of the rim 210. Such a preload force on the tire beads 222, 220 of the wheel tire 214 allows to fill the intermediate space 234 between the inner tire 228 and the wheel tire 214 with not more than a very low pressure, for example, in the range of 1 bar. Thereby, the wheel tire 214 can provide a very high traction without a risk that the tire beads 220, 222 disconnect from the rim 210 upon occurrence of the severe deformation to be expected of the wheel tire 214.

FIG. 1 of the application illustrates the basis of the technology, similar to the above graphic from Schwalbe.com.

Schwalbe FIG. 1

I ride some pretty rocky trails out in western Maryland and could benefit greatly from this system even in cross country riding. Looking forward to this tech hitting the market!

Future of Road Tubeless from Mavic

Several years ago, coming from mtb, I didn’t really know what my friend was talking about when he said that he chose to go with clinchers instead of tubies. At the time, I was still running tubes, not knowing of other options. Today, I’m running tubeless on mtb, hoping to run tubular for cx, and still in tubes for road.

But I may not be hoping for tubulars for much longer. In US 2015/0028660, published on January  29, 2105, Mavic  discloses a new rim that “is as lightweight as a tubular tire wheel and as practical as an open pneumatic tire wheel.”

Mavic FIG. 2

As shown above in FIG. 2, the bead 6 of the tire 2 includes portions that fit into the hook 35 and stop 37 as shown below in FIGs. 6a-6g.

Mavic FIGs. 6

As shown below in FIG. 5, the balance of the forces on the hook 35 and the stop 37 allow the rim and tire combination to withstand pressures of up to 10 bar (~145 psi).

Mavic FIG. 5

Moreover, the design of the rim helps decrease pinch flatting. Shown below in FIG. 7, the base 36 of the rim helps to distribute the forces from impacts in more areas than just the flanges 32 of the sidewalls 33.

Mavic FIG. 7

These features are also intended to be applicable to mountain biking. I hope this technology comes fast so I don’t have to learn how to glue tubulars.

New Product Lines coming from Specialized?

It is important to remember that “intellectual property” includes more than just utility and design patents. A healthy IP portfolio will include patents but will also include consideration for your brand – specifically, trademarks. The most (in)famous player in the cycling industry regarding trademarks is probably Specialized. The Cafe Roubaix-Specialized incident has been widely covered.

Regardless of community perception, Specialized has an organized trademark strategy that many other businesses can learn from. Further, because US trademark filings are public, we can learn some about Specialized’s strategy/future products.

Specialized has recently filed the following trademark applications:

LIFT– for Bicycle frames; Bicycles – filed: March 16, 2015

RUZE – for Bicycle frames; Bicycles – filed: March 13, 2015

HELLGA – for Bicycle frames; Bicycles – filed: December 16, 2014

RYHME – for Bicycle frames; Bicycles – filed: November 20, 2014

Neither searching Specialized.com nor the internet turn up any Specialized bikes featuring any of those names. The closest I found was speculation that HELLGA was to be a women specific fat bike.

These applications use similar descriptions of the goods that the trademarks are used on to those registered trademarks of CARVE, CRUX, CAMBER, and VENGE. If Specialized stays true to their previous filings, it looks like we could see new LIFT, RUZE, HELLGA, and RYHME bikes form Specialized.

Note – these are all word marks meaning that there are no fun pictures associated with these yet. Only text. From a trademark perspective, that means that these marks can be used in any style, font, color, etc.

Less Conspicuous Electric-Assist Bicycle from Faraday Bicycles

In view of recent news reports of inspections for mechanical doping, we look at a beautifully designed electric-assist bike from Faraday Bicycles.

Faraday Bicycles

Source: FaradayBikes.com

The Faraday Porteur was reportedly designed with help from Rock Lobster Cycles. And, as any good startup or kickstarter should, Faraday got their IP in order. On February 24, 2015, US 8,960,702 issued, and on April 2, 2013, US 8,408,349 issued to Faraday.

Faraday FIGs 2 and 3

FIGS. 2 and 3 of the ‘349 Patent, above, show that the electronics housing 50 is disposed between the upper top tube 40 and the lower top tube 38 and rearward of the seat tube 16.

Faraday FIG 4

FIG. 4 of the ‘349 Patent shows batteries 42 and 44 extending into the upper top tube 40 and the lower top tube 38, respectively, from the electronics housing 50.

Farady FIG 9

FIG. 9 of the ‘702 Patent shows an another design in which a battery management electronics unit 266 is disposed in the seat tube 244 and the battery pack 254 is disposed in the down tube 242.

Not sure that this bike will be winning any races, but it looks like a great option for getting around town.